Tuesday, February 21, 2017

100 Words and a Quote


100 Words and a Quote is a feature in which I review books in exactly 100 words and share my favorite quote from each book. It’s fun, but it can also be challenging to make what I have to say fit that count. Well, I do love a good challenge. I do this for books when I can’t give much detail for fear of spoiling, for series finales, when I need to clean up my TBR, for novellas, and for those rare times when I just don’t have much to say about a book whether I loved it or not. Hope you enjoy my take on the (extra mini) mini-review. 


Title: Room 
Author: Emma Donoghue  
Publisher: Little, Brown, and Co. 
Published: September 13th, 2010
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Summary: To five-year-old Jack, Room is the entire world. It is where he was born and grew up; it's where he lives with his Ma as they learn and read and eat and sleep and play. At night, his Ma shuts him safely in the wardrobe, where he is meant to be asleep when Old Nick visits.

Room is home to Jack, but to Ma, it is the prison where Old Nick has held her captive for seven years. Through determination, ingenuity, and fierce motherly love, Ma has created a life for Jack. But she knows it's not enough...not for her or for him. She devises a bold escape plan, one that relies on her young son's bravery and a lot of luck. What she does not realize is just how unprepared she is for the plan to actually work.

Told entirely in the language of the energetic, pragmatic five-year-old Jack, Room is a celebration of resilience and the limitless bond between parent and child, a brilliantly executed novel about what it means to journey from one world to another.



Devastatingly beautiful. An entire story told from the perspective of a five-year-old little boy, born in captivity, whose entire world is one room. One room that he shares with his mother, a young woman abducted and forced to endure visits from “Old Nick” while Jack sleeps. Ma does the very best for her little boy that she possibly can. Thought provoking, haunting, and at one point incredibly intense, this book is unlike anything I’ve ever read. Heartbreaking, yes; but thanks to Jack, there was also laughter. This bright little hope-filled boy captured my heart. He’ll do the same to yours.


“Scared is what you're feeling... but brave is what you're doing.” 




Author: Laurie Halse Anderson  
Publisher: Viking Books 
Published: January 7th, 2014
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Summary: For the past five years, Hayley Kincain and her father, Andy, have been on the road, never staying long in one place as he struggles to escape the demons that have tortured him since his return from Iraq. Now they are back in the town where he grew up so Hayley can attend school. Perhaps, for the first time, Hayley can have a normal life, put aside her own painful memories, even have a relationship with Finn, the hot guy who obviously likes her but is hiding secrets of his own.

Will being back home help Andy’s PTSD, or will his terrible memories drag him to the edge of hell, and drugs push him over? The Impossible Knife of Memory is Laurie Halse Anderson at her finest: compelling, surprising, and impossible to put down.  





Seventeen-year-old Hayley is back in school, attempting an ordinary life after years on the road with her father following his return from Iraq. Hayley meets Finn and finally feels like a normal teen, but will her dad’s demons once again force them from the life Hayley longs to have? I’ve read books dealing with PTSD, but this is the first I’ve read with a POV from the child of a parent with PTSD.  It was extremely eye-opening. I love Finn and Hayley’s friendship as well as the growth of their characters.  A raw and engaging story from a must-read author.


“People who have to announce that they are trustworthy deserve to be lied to.” 




Author: Amy Harmon  
Publisher: Createspace
Published: May 11th, 2016
Goodreads | Amazon | B&N

Summary: Swallow, Daughter, pull them in, those words that sit upon your lips. Lock them deep inside your soul, hide them ‘til they’ve time to grow. Close your mouth upon the power, curse not, cure not, ‘til the hour. You won’t speak and you won’t tell, you won’t call on heav’n or hell. You will learn and you will thrive. Silence, Daughter. Stay alive.

The day my mother was killed, she told my father I wouldn’t speak again, and she told him if I died, he would die too. Then she predicted the king would trade his soul and lose his son to the sky.

My father has a claim to the throne, and he is waiting in the shadows for all of my mother’s words to come to pass. He wants desperately to be king, and I just want to be free.

But freedom will require escape, and I’m a prisoner of my mother’s curse and my father’s greed. I can’t speak or make a sound, and I can’t wield a sword or beguile a king. In a land purged of enchantment, love might be the only magic left, and who could ever love . . . a bird?



This was my first Amy Harmon book, and I found her writing to be lovely and lyrical. The last words Lark’s mother spoke were a spell, and Lark hasn’t spoken a word since. Forced to reside in the king’s castle, she plots escape and yearns for freedom. I didn’t love all the characters (Tiras = asscrown), but I could still appreciate other aspects of the story. Not my favorite fantasy I’ve read; but the concept, setting, and stunning writing make me very glad I read it. The spells are my favorite part, and I’m a sucker for a gorgeous epilogue.


He considered me broken and I was incredibly grateful for all my jagged pieces that kept him away.” 


© at A Belle's Tales

  


                   

13 comments:

  1. I was so curious about The Bird and the Sword but if its not your favorite then maybe not one for me... at least not right now? The other two sound absolutely heartbreaking. This is still my favorite feature of yours. Love you!

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    1. It may not be my favorite; but I still liked it, and I just know you will, too. The writing alone is worth it. So yes, read it! Read it for me! lol Thank you, lobster - love you more xo

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  2. I am starting to read some good buzz for The Bird adn the Sword and I am curious. I have long had Room on my list, but I am not brave enough to read it. The book about PTSD sounds like a great read. I love these reviews!

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    1. I think you'll appreciate the writing, but it's not my favorite fantasy. I'll be curious to see what you think.
      I want you to read Room! I know it sounds like such a difficult read; and I wish I could say more, but I don't want to spoil anything. Just trust me and give it a chance ;) Thank you, sweet friend <3

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  3. I have the Bird and the Sword on audio. I need to try The Impossible Knife of Memory. Great mini reviews :)

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    1. I look forward to your thoughts on the audio. Thank you, Kim :)

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  4. Oh man, Room will require emotional prep. And I really want to read Harmon's book.

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    1. It does, but it's so worth it :)

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  5. These are awesome Michele. I'm interested to try The Impossible Knife of Memory. Great reviews :)

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    1. Thank you, Van! I hope you do -- it's a really interesting read, and Finn is so lovable!

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  6. oh all three of those look so good. I've heard great things about Harmon's writing, it sounds beautiful, I'd have to check it out

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    1. They really were good! Yes, Harmon's writing is beautiful -- I just wish I could have connected with the characters more.

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  7. All of these sound interesting. I have read other books by Anderson and enjoyed them. I have been curious about Room for a while, so it was great to hear your thoughts. :)
    ~Jess

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